The Dickinsonian

  • January 3The Dickinsonian's new website has officially launched! Stay tuned for new stories and features.

Let’s Get Reel: The Bold Type

Lauren Toneatto ’21, Social Media Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Instantly, my weekend became better when I noticed The Bold Type season three had premiered on Freeform.  Admittedly, The Bold Type isn’t my favorite show I’ve ever watched (considering I didn’t even know season three was set to come out now, unlike many Game of Thrones fans counting down the days until the final season’s premiere). 

That being said, season three has been a pleasure to watch and my excitement towards this TV series has exponentially risen since it debuted in 2017. 

At first, I was on the fence whether or not to begin watching this series at all. Following three best friends fresh out of college working for the women’s magazine, Scarlet, this plot sounded particularly appealing. 

Yet, despite the enticing plot description, the initial commercials for the show were off-putting. It seemed like the series was trying too hard to be serious yet quirky, a combo I didn’t know if I wanted to waste time watching. Nevertheless, I ultimately hit play one day and have continued watching up until season three. 

While one of the three protagonists Jane (Katie Stevens) likes to pretend she’s a hard-hitting journalist, The Bold Type certainly isn’t a hard-hitting show. It’s definitely a series I watch when I need a break, and I probably pay attention to my phone as much as my TV screen. That being said, the series touches on several contemporary, political driven topics for spectator’s desiring a deeper component to their television viewing experience. Kat (Aisha Dee), another of the three focal females, tends to be the topic of these conversation-starting episodes. As an African American, queer female who is also the head of Scarlet’s Social Media department, Kat’s race, sexuality and highly regarded position provide the show with numerous talking points. 

In my opinion, Kat is a much more likeable and interesting character than Jane, the typical focus of many plot points; therefore, I don’t mind when episodes highlight Kat and her struggles and endeavors. 

In the first episode of season three, Kat makes a particularly poignant performance, showcasing Kat’s roller coaster of emotions and responsibilities following a break up. Kat doesn’t overwhelm others with her feelings, but when she does open up to her best friends, it makes for a particularly impactful message. 

A balance with serious topics, The Bold Type also integrates comedy. Sutton (Meghann Fahy), the final member of the fab three, particularly showcases witty one-liners. As the fashion department assistant, her upbeat desire to prove herself as a worthy employee contrasts nicely with her uptight boss, Oliver (Stephen Conrad Moore). In season three, episode two, Sutton and Oliver’s dynamic takes an emotional turn. Watching this episode unfold was definitely a highlight of the season so far. 

You shouldn’t plan on clearing your schedule to immediately binge The Bold Type, but if you find yourself needing a new show to watch, this Freeform series could definitely be a contender. 

All three seasons are currently streaming on Freeform’s website. This show perfectly integrates serious topics and humor, making it a great show for all audiences to enjoy. 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Leave a Comment

The Dickinsonian strives to provide a forum for lively and respectful discussion among members of the Dickinson College community. We reserve the right to remove any comments that we do not adhere to our community standards.

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

The student news site of Dickinson College.
Let’s Get Reel: The Bold Type