Oktoberfest Celebrates German Traditions

Shane Shuma ’22, Staff Writer

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The German club hosted their annual Oktoberfest celebration to mirror the event held in Munich, Germany. 

The event, which took place on Saturday, Oct. 12, initially had light attendance at its 6:00 p.m. start time. However, more people filed in as the night continued.

Traditional German music played in the background while some people spoke in German and others spoke in English. Students in the German department, students interested in German culture and foreign exchange students from the University of Bremen were in attendance. Traditional south German cuisine was served, including bratwurst, sauerkraut, pretzels and beer for those over 21. At times the people working the back of the house’s kitchen brought out more food just as the old plates had been thoroughly emptied. Overall the event was well attended from nearly beginning to end with the Kade House at or near full capacity for the occasion.

Kat Usavage ’23, German club Treasurer, helped prepare food and managed the event and said, “It’s just a fun little get together for anyone a part of the German club or taking a German class where we have traditional German beverages and foods.” 

Oktoberfest began on Sept. 21, 1810 to celebrate the marriage of King Ludwig and Princess Theresa of Saxen Hildburg-hausen. 

Victoria Gralla ’23 currently takes German 201. She liked the Oktoberfest event because of its broad appeal to the entire student body. “I think it was really fun and it was a great opportunity to talk with students who come from various backgrounds but are all interested in Oktoberfest,” she said. Associate Professor of German Sarah McGaughey serves as the faculty advisor to the club and echoed her enthusiasm. “Oktoberfest is probably the best know German cultural event of the year and as such it is also the most welcoming,” McGaughey said and continued that the event “allows people from all sorts of backgrounds to participate and that’s why the Dickinson club has always been interested in it.” 

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